Q&A With Wally Bock: Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time

"Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time" Book Cover

Wally Bock, a frequent contributor to ConnectionCulture.com and a leadership coach, recently published a new book titled Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time. Wally’s practical, effective advice always resonates with readers and his book addresses common leadership challenges.

Here’s what Wally had to say about his new book and favorite leadership tips:

3 Ways to Lead Like Lincoln

White House portrait of Abraham Lincoln

It’s fashionable in the media and politics today to be quick to speak, to dominate conversations and be self-righteous. We see this frequently in movies and television shows too. These attributes are thought to be signs of intelligence, assertiveness and conviction. Although they may be effective at gaining television ratings and press attention, they are counterproductive when it comes to communicating, connecting with others and leading effectively.

One of history’s greatest leaders and communicators was President Abraham Lincoln who led our country through the particularly divisive time of the Civil War. He was known as a patient, careful listener who was slow to speak and slow to become angry, wisdom he may have picked up from reading the Bible (see James 1:19). These attributes contributed to his reputation for being thoughtful, and for possessing wisdom and good judgment. They also helped him develop a strong network of supporters.

To Avoid Micromanagement, Minimize Unnecessary Rules and Excessive Controls

Micromanaged employees like puppets on a string

Unnecessary rules and excessive controls devalue people by making them feel that they are not trusted or respected. A leader who micromanages his people will not engage or energize them.

Micromanaged employees are more likely to feel disconnected because it is a universal human need to have a reasonable degree of autonomy or freedom to do our work. When people have autonomy, they have a greater sense of control and experience personal growth as they develop new skills and expertise.

It was a pleasure speaking with Jim Blasingame, host of the Small Business Advocate program, about three common types of leaders: aggressive, passive, and assertive. Which type are you? Listen now to find out.

Date: July 1, 2016
Appearance: Interview With Jim Blasingame: What Type of Leader is Best?
Outlet: Small Business Advocate
Format: Radio

General George C. Marshall: Soldier of Peace

General George C. Marshall

George C. Marshall was one of the most extraordinary individuals to have lived during the twentieth century. Born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1880 and trained at the Virginia Military Institute, Marshall was a career military man who will forever be remembered for his efforts to promote peace and bring about a strong connection between America and Western Europe.

How 3 Leadership Styles Contribute to or Undermine Your Success

Aggressive Businesswoman

Connection is a bond based on shared identity, empathy and understanding that moves individuals toward group-centered membership. It’s an essential attribute of successful teams, departments and organizations.

Groups with a high degree of connection have an assertive communication and leadership style. Being assertive means you speak and act in ways that reflect honesty and integrity, i.e. you say and do what you mean and don’t try to manipulate others by moving against them or moving away from them.

“ATD Podcast with Admiral Vern Clark”
by Association for Talent Development (ATD)

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ATD Podcast
May 31, 2016

It was a pleasure to interview Admiral Vern Clark, former Chief of Naval Operations in the U.S. Navy, about the approach he used to help the Navy achieve its goal of “winning the battle for people” and boosting retention rates. The interview is part 1 in a series of podcasts with Admiral Clark produced by the Association for Talent Development.

Do You Have “Still Face” Managers in Your Organization?

Robot Representing Still Face Manager

Do you have “still face” managers in your organization? By still face managers, I mean supervisors whose lack of emotion makes it difficult for them to connect and to get people fired up. They seem unable to express appropriate emotion when interacting with others. The disconnection the other person experiences can be confusing, discouraging or lead to reaching a wrong conclusion.

I look forward to giving the afternoon keynote address at the 2016 Annual Sharing Day hosted by NJ Organization Development. This year’s program will focus on exploring a deeper understanding of what’s really needed from leaders in today’s chaotic and ever changing business climate. Click the links below for registration details.

Date: May 5, 2016
Time: 7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Event: NJ Organization Development Annual Sharing Day
Sponsor: NJ Organization Development (NJOD)
Venue: Ramada Plaza Inn, Newark Airport
Location: 160 Frontage Road
Newark, NJ 07114
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.
More Info: Click here for more information.