Connect Others Through “Flash Mentoring”

Service-Bell_Flash-Mentoring-1024x731

 

#51 Employ “Flash Mentoring”

One way to match mentors and mentees is to ask them to commit to meet just once to see if both parties “click” (or “connect,” if you will) and if the mentor believes he/she has the knowledge/expertise and sufficient time available to meet the mentee’s needs and expectations. If both parties agree to continue, they should agree to a set number of additional meetings rather than leave the term open-ended. Unless both mentor and mentee agree to a set number of additional meetings, there is no commitment to meet again. “Flash mentoring” was a term coined by K. Scott Derrick in his work with 13L, a group of federal employees who share a passion for leadership excellence.

This is the fifty-first post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

John Wooden: They Called Him Coach

Day of Discovery Document John Wooden They Called Him Coach

Day of Discovery Documentary – John Wooden: They Called Him Coach

I’ve written a lot about legendary Coach John Wooden on this blog, and for good reason. His life, leadership, and legacy are an inspiration to us all.

I highly recommend taking the time to watch the documentary John Wooden: They Called Him Coach, available online. You’ll learn more about Wooden’s perspective on success, love, and faith and see interviews with his family and former players. It will definitely motivate you to be a better leader, family member, and friend.

What’s your favorite Coach Wooden story? Feel free to share in the comments.

 

Connect by Cascading Your Vision

Leader Discussing Plans with Team

#17 Cascade Your Vision

When Frances Hesselbein led a remarkable turnaround of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. she implemented an inclusive annual planning process. Frances communicated the vision, mission and annual objectives then explained why each objective was selected. She gave people a voice to provide feedback about “what’s right, what’s wrong and what’s missing” from the vision and annual objectives. Her leadership team considered the feedback, made adjustments and communicated the final plan.

You should do the same. At some point in the year, repeat the process after you’ve factored in how well your plans are working and what adjustments are warranted given more current information. An inclusive process to establish annual objectives and action plans engages people and helps them align their behavior with the plan. If you want to learn more about a detailed process to implement this approach, read Michael Kanazawa and Robert Miles’ book Big Ideas to Big Results.

This is the seventeenth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

3 Leadership Practices of Bono and U2 – Part II

U2 rose from a band with less than ideal musical skills when it began in 1976 to today having received a remarkable 22 Grammy awards, morethan any band in history. At the 71st Golden Globe Awards ceremony on January 12, the band added yet another accomplishment to its credit: the Golden Globe for Best Original Song from a Motion Picture for “Ordinary Love” from the movie “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.”

U2 Ordinary Love Album Cover

U2 Ordinary Love Album Cover

In my last article, “3 Practices CEOs Should Adopt from this Rock Star,” I credited Bono’s leadership of U2 as a key factor behind the band’s success. His leadership approach can be described in one sentence: Bono communicates an inspiring vision and lives it, values people, and gives them a voice.  CEOs would be wise to follow Bono’s example. In the article I highlighted three aspects of Bono’s leadership. As a follow up, here are three practical ways CEOs can implement leadership practices like those of Bono. 

3 Practices CEOs Should Adopt from this Rock Star

U2's Bono

As seen on Fox Business

One of the great success stories of our time is the rock band U2.  When the band began in 1976, its musical skills left much to be desired. More than three decades later, U2 has received a remarkable 22 Grammy awards, more than any band in history.  In addition, the band surpassed the Rolling Stones’ record for the highest revenue grossing concert tour. How did this transformation happen?

Like all great groups, leadership makes the difference.  Bono is U2’s leader, lead singer and lyricist. His leadership approach can be described in one sentence: Bono communicates an inspiring vision and lives it, values people, and gives them a voice.  CEOs would be wise to follow Bono’s example. 

Connection Requires the Right Attitude

#14 Develop an Attitude of Commitment, Courage and Perseverance – To develop the strength of character that intentional connectors have requires commitment, courage and perseverance.  Commitment is required to develop the habit of connecting. Courage is required because some people will reject your efforts to connect, whether due to circumstance or personality.  When our efforts to connect are spurned, the part of the brain that feels physical pain becomes active and it triggers a sense of “social pain.” Understanding this natural response will help you be prepared for it. Perseverance is required to reach the point where connecting is now part of your character.

This is the fourteenth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Practice Five Minute Favors

five minutes on timer

#13 Practice Five Minute Favors – In his excellent book Give and Take, Wharton professor Adam Grant advocates the practice of “five minute favors,” i.e. you should be willing to help anyone if it takes only five minutes. Grant argues that helping others connects them to us and helps develop a supportive network.

This is the thirteenth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Reach Out to the Disconnected

Hand Reaching Out to Help #12 Connect with the Disconnected – People who are disconnected need our help.  Throw them a lifeline by taking action to connect with them.  Perhaps you can encourage them with a smile, a kind word, an offer to buy them a cup of coffee or by holding open a door for them. There are hundreds of ways to connect and small things can make a big difference over time.

People who become disconnected and feel left out suffer. Neuroscientists call what they feel “social pain” because feeling left out activates the parts of the brain where human beings feel physical pain and it causes people to become more anxious, more stressed, less social, less energetic, less rational and diminishes their self-control.  Disconnection is not only unproductive, it is potentially dangerous if the isolated individual becomes angry and decides to retaliate.  This is why we need to show mercy and reach out to help the disconnected reconnect.

This is the twelfth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Recognize and Affirm Grit

#9 Recognize and Affirm Grit – Psychologist Angela Duckworth found that affirming people’s day-in-and-day-out passion, work effort and perseverance helped them develop “grit,” a form of tenacity that makes them more effective workers. Be sure to talk about grit, to look for signs of it in others and affirm them for it.

This is the ninth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others.  Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.