Does your organization have the data capture and practices in place to develop engaged employees from the time they are recruited through onboarding and ongoing training? Has your organization identified “moments of truth” in the employee experience that make or break employee engagement?

At the ATD TalentNext Conference, I’ll share how to develop employee experience paths that address the needs and desires of different employee segments using frameworks and metrics used by marketing professionals.

Register for the conference today and save 30% with the code TALENTNEXT30.

Date: November 8, 2017
Time: 8:30-9:30 a.m.
Event: Presentation at ATD TalentNext Conference
Topic: Developing Engaged Employees
Sponsor: Association for Talent Development (ATD)
Venue: West Palm Beach Hilton
Location: West Palm Beach, FL
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.
More Info: Click here for more information.

3 Ways to Encourage Knowledge Flow

Disengaged employees explaining employee engagement to their boss

In June of 2000, the combative Durk Jager resigned as CEO of Procter & Gamble after a tenure that had lasted only seventeen months. When he left P&G, its stock had declined 50 percent, it had lost $320 million in the most recent quarter, half of its brands were losing market share, and the firm was struggling with morale problems.

3 Practices to Improve the Contribution of Your Core Employees

Business Professionals

The prevalence and extreme nature of star systems in organizations today contribute to widespread employee disconnection and disengagement, particularly among core employees.

Employees can be regarded as stars, core employees, or strugglers. Stars are superior performers. They are either a part of senior management or on track to move up the organization’s hierarchy. Core employees are valuable contributors but not stars. Strugglers perform poorly, some for temporary reasons and others because they may not fit well in their roles or with the organization.

Beware the Brutally Honest Workplace

People yelling at each other in brutally honest workplace

An old fad is making a comeback: the “brutally honest workplace.” From my vantage point, interacting with your colleagues using “radical candor” or “radical transparency” is a subtle—and sometimes not so subtle—form of verbal assault that seems to be spreading, given the success of firms like Bridgewater Associates, and contributing to the rise of incivility and insensitivity today. Proponents of this approach sometimes say that offering constructive criticism should come from a caring mindset but, from what I’ve seen, it merely gives the arrogant and the bullies permission to verbally attack others in the name of honesty. Fortunately, recent research shows the foolishness of this approach (in fact, even mild expressions of rudeness have been shown to impair team performance).

“Connection Culture Discussion on TotalPicture Radio”
by Peter Clayton and Michael Stallard

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TotalPicture Radio
January 19, 2017

Employee engagement has been a glaring and expensive problem for years, costing companies billions of dollars in lost productivity and employee turnover. I discuss this and other workplace issues with Peter Clayton, host of the Leadership Channel podcast on TotalPicture Radio.

Last year when I was teaching a Connection Culture workshop in Amsterdam, Carmina Glazenborg from Bentley Systems in Amstelveen, The Netherlands, shared with the group her experience working as an intern at Disney World in Orlando, Florida. Listen to Ms. Glazenborg’s story by clicking on the video above. (more…)

What Disengaged Employees Would Say to the Boss (If They Could Be Honest)

Disengaged employees explaining employee engagement to their boss

In 2016 you received the results of your company’s employee engagement survey. They were disappointing. In 2017 you need to understand why and make changes that will boost employee engagement.

Suppose you could hear the honest truth about what the people you are responsible for leading think you should do to engage them? Here’s what it would most likely sound like if communicated through a wise and capable spokesperson.

What Mayo Clinic Discovered About Burnout

Business Lunch to Stop Burnout

Could something as simple as regularly having a meal with colleagues to discuss work experience-related issues help reduce burnout? It seems too simple doesn’t it? Although several factors contribute to burnout, there is good reason to believe connection practices such as taking time to talk with others over lunch or dinner provides a measure of protection. It is certainly having that desired effect at Mayo Clinic.