3 Ways to Develop Winning Team Spirit

Jeff Webb of Varsity Brands

Photo of Jeff Webb courtesy of Varsity Brands

As football season begins, millions of fans are excited about cheering on their favorite high school, college or NFL teams. The best teams, those that are competitive over time, benefit from having a winning team spirit.

A winning team spirit is a mood that fills an individual or group with life. It brings about enthusiasm, energy and engagement, and helps the team perform at the top of its game. Therefore, every leader who aspires to lead his or her team to sustainable success – whether in the sports world or business world – must be able to create and maintain a winning team spirit.

3 Ways to Lead Like Lincoln

White House portrait of Abraham Lincoln

It’s fashionable in the media and politics today to be quick to speak, to dominate conversations and be self-righteous. We see this frequently in movies and television shows too. These attributes are thought to be signs of intelligence, assertiveness and conviction. Although they may be effective at gaining television ratings and press attention, they are counterproductive when it comes to communicating, connecting with others and leading effectively.

One of history’s greatest leaders and communicators was President Abraham Lincoln who led our country through the particularly divisive time of the Civil War. He was known as a patient, careful listener who was slow to speak and slow to become angry, wisdom he may have picked up from reading the Bible (see James 1:19). These attributes contributed to his reputation for being thoughtful, and for possessing wisdom and good judgment. They also helped him develop a strong network of supporters.

DRH Group Reviews “Connection Culture” Book

DRH Group
August 9, 2016

Doug Hensch, president of DRH Group, recently reviewed my book Connection Culture: The Competitive Advantage of Shared Identity, Empathy, and Understanding at Work.

In his review, Hensch writes: “There are still some lonely people out there who think the sole purpose of a business to produce a profit. Unfortunately, profits are just like oxygen. Oxygen makes life possible but not necessarily worth living. And, Stallard writes, ‘Connection is what transforms a dog-eat-dog environment into a sled dog team that pulls together.'”

Read the full review.

To Avoid Micromanagement, Minimize Unnecessary Rules and Excessive Controls

Micromanaged employees like puppets on a string

Unnecessary rules and excessive controls devalue people by making them feel that they are not trusted or respected. A leader who micromanages his people will not engage or energize them.

Micromanaged employees are more likely to feel disconnected because it is a universal human need to have a reasonable degree of autonomy or freedom to do our work. When people have autonomy, they have a greater sense of control and experience personal growth as they develop new skills and expertise.

It was a pleasure speaking with Jim Blasingame, host of the Small Business Advocate program, about three common types of leaders: aggressive, passive, and assertive. Which type are you? Listen now to find out.

Date: July 1, 2016
Appearance: Interview With Jim Blasingame: What Type of Leader is Best?
Outlet: Small Business Advocate
Format: Radio