Persevere to Reconnect

Man holding bouquet of flowers and knocking on door

#64 Persevere to Reconnect

Sometimes saying you’re sorry isn’t enough. Don’t give up. Keep reaching out to reconnect.  Doing so is a sign of your good character (it can be said that you have the character strength of magnanimity).

This is the sixty-fourth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

“Fired Up or Burned Out”
by Kelly Riggs

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Business LockerRoom
November 2014

This is a radio interview I did with Kelly Riggs of the Business LockerRoom radio show. We talked about the core elements of a Connection Culture and the qualities of great leaders. Listen to the interview clip and let me know your thoughts.

I’m happy to share that my article entitled “Closing the Leadership Gap” has been featured in The Smart Manager’s November/December issue. Learn how combining intuition and analytics is the best way to diagnose and correct employee engagement challenges.

Appearance: Closing the Leadership Gap Featured in The Smart Manager
Outlet: The Smart Manager
Location: India
Format: Magazine

To Connect, Celebrate High Five Moments

Happy Business People Giving High Fives

#63 Celebrate High Five Moments

In Fired Up or Burned Out, we wrote about Cranium, the games company, and how it is intentional about designing games so that people will experience “high five moments.” One form of physical touch that can be appropriate in the workplace (depending upon the context) is to give someone a “hive five” or “fist bump” when they perform well. These are acceptable ways to give recognition in more informal cultures. Research has found sports teams that express recognition in more physical forms perform better.

This is the sixty-third post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Provide Autonomy in Goal-Setting

Write Goals Down

#62 Provide Autonomy in Goal-Setting

As much as possible, let your direct reports establish their Top Five annual goals after communicating that their goals need to align with your Top Five. Talk through the goals with each employee to find SHARED goals that will advance your organization’s and the individual employee’s interests. It may not be possible to find a perfect set of goals that meet the interests of all so make the effort to find the best possible set of goals and you will be rewarded by people who execute their tasks with greater energy and enthusiasm.

This is the sixty-second post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

December Leadership Development Carnival

Leadership Development Carnival Logo

I am honored to host the December installment of the Leadership Development Carnival, a collection of helpful leadership advice from top bloggers. This month’s carnival doesn’t adhere to any particular theme, but rather features content on a variety of leadership topics and issues.

Take a moment to click through each of the great submissions, and be sure to share this collection of posts with someone you believe would benefit from the advice. 

The Optimum Number of Annual Goals

Woman Writing Goals on Board

#61 Set “Top Five” Annual Goals

Both individually and as a team, set no more than five challenging but achievable annual goals.  If you go beyond five annual goals, it will diminish focus and effective execution by tending to overwhelm those responsible for implementation. One day each week, review your weekly plans to see that they are aligned with your Top Five.

This is the sixty-first post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Closing Your Company’s “Leadership Gap”

The Office Cast, Photo Courtesy of NBC

The Office Cast, Photo Courtesy of NBC

Historically, leaders have relied on their internal networks and intuition to assess employee engagement and strategic alignment.  Tom Peters and Robert Waterman called it “management by wandering around” or “MBWA” in their classic book In Search of Excellence.

Just as intuition once tricked us into believing that the world was flat and the sun rotated around the earth, it is a flaw of human nature that most leaders are mistaken in their assessment of the engagement and alignment of people they lead. They don’t recognize employee engagement and alignment problems until they feel the pain from underperformance or face reality in the form of poor results from an employee engagement survey.

To Connect, Learn and Apply the Five Languages of Appreciation

Wrapped gift#60 Learn and Apply the Five Languages of Appreciation

Ask your direct reports about memorable times when they received recognition at work. As they describe these times, ask questions to identify their primary and secondary languages of appreciation (also known as “love languages”).

The five languages of appreciation in the workplace are as follows: words of affirmation, quality time, acts of service, gifts, and physical touch. (Please note that physical touch is not a primary language of appreciation in the workplace.) To learn more, read Gary Chapman and Paul White’s The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace.

This is the sixtieth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.

Create a Culture Office to Promote Connection

Southwest-Airlines

#59 Create a Culture Office to Promote Connection

Research has shown that connection begins to breakdown when the number of individuals in an organization exceeds 150.  Establishing a culture office or center that reports to the CEO and promotes connection is a best practice.

For example, Southwest Airlines has a Culture Office that reports to the CEO. The Culture Office has 30 people and is responsible for promoting Southwest’s culture. In addition, there is a Culture Committee of 150 individuals who are spread throughout the company.

Texas Christian University (TCU) established the TCU Center for Connection Culture. Its vision is to make TCU the model for Connection Culture in higher education and the Center’s mission is to be the catalyst for intentional connection at TCU.

This is the fifty-ninth post in our series entitled “100 Ways to Connect.” The series highlights language, attitudes and behaviors that help you connect with others. Although the language, attitudes and behaviors focus on application in the workplace, you will see that they also apply to your relationships at home and in the community.